Space and the Logos and Art and Poems

Posts I find valuable to the world. Science, logic, reason, and the arts. Some evangelist bashing as well.

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2 years ago on March/07/2012 at 12:02am with 156 notesReblog
#science  #astrology  #neurology  #chemistry  #physics 

(Source: athomasj)

2 years ago on February/12/2012 at 03:11am with 362 notesReblog
#physics  #science 
darrenbracey:

Quark-Gluon Plasma, the Densest Form of Matter Ever Observed 
The above image is a reconstruction of particle tracks captured in the STAR Time Projection Chamber during a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiment that smashed Gold nuclei (which consists of 79 protons and 118 neutrons) together at nearly the speed of light, creating a fireball hot enough to melt protons and neutrons into a primordial superhot substance known as quark-gluon plasma. 
The quark-gluon plasma, said to be the densest matter ever observed, is so hot it is more than a hundred thousand times hotter than the inside of the sun. 
Want to learn more? Go here.

darrenbracey:

Quark-Gluon Plasma, the Densest Form of Matter Ever Observed 

The above image is a reconstruction of particle tracks captured in the STAR Time Projection Chamber during a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiment that smashed Gold nuclei (which consists of 79 protons and 118 neutrons) together at nearly the speed of light, creating a fireball hot enough to melt protons and neutrons into a primordial superhot substance known as quark-gluon plasma. 

The quark-gluon plasma, said to be the densest matter ever observed, is so hot it is more than a hundred thousand times hotter than the inside of the sun. 

Want to learn more? Go here.

2 years ago on February/03/2012 at 03:25pm with 288 notesReblog
#physics  #quantum mechanics 
jack-you-dead:

The Solvay conference in 1927 on quantum mechanics

16 of the 28 Men pictured here received a Nobel Prize at some point in their lives. The one woman, pictured third from the left of the front row, received two Nobel Prizes.

jack-you-dead:

The Solvay conference in 1927 on quantum mechanics

16 of the 28 Men pictured here received a Nobel Prize at some point in their lives. The one woman, pictured third from the left of the front row, received two Nobel Prizes.

npr:

The recent photographs of the Northern Lights have been wonderful, but this video of the Northern Lights in motion is extraordinary. -Savy

condenasttraveler:

Northern Lights over Norwegian Laplands

(Source: Guardian)


the-star-stuff:

Happy birthday to Michio Kaku! Dr. Kaku is a theoretical physicist born in January 24, 1947 in San Jose, California. He is a co-founder of string field theory and a populizer of science.

2 years ago on January/08/2012 at 02:57pm with 766 notesReblog
#science  #physics 
astrotastic:

divineirony:

thepoemthatdoesntrhyme:

miu-sherandhiscollar:

A 40-year-old puzzle of superstring theory solved by supercomputer
A group of three researchers from KEK, Shizuoka University and Osaka University has for the first time revealed the way our universe was born with 3 spatial dimensions from 10-dimensional superstring theory in which spacetime has 9 spatial directions and 1 temporal direction. This result was obtained by numerical simulation on a supercomputer.
“According to Big Bang cosmology, the universe originated in an explosion from an invisibly tiny point. This theory is strongly supported by observation of the cosmic microwave background and the relative abundance of elements. However, a situation in which the whole universe is a tiny point exceeds the reach of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, and for that reason it has not been possible to clarify how the universe actually originated.
In superstring theory, which is considered to be the “theory of everything”, all the elementary particles are represented as various oscillation modes of very tiny strings. Among those oscillation modes, there is one that corresponds to a particle that mediates gravity, and thus the general theory of relativity can be naturally extended to the scale of elementary particles. Therefore, it is expected that superstring theory allows the investigation of the birth of the universe. However, actual calculation has been intractable because the interaction between strings is strong, so all investigation thus far has been restricted to discussing various models or scenarios.
Superstring theory predicts a space with 9 dimensions, which poses the big puzzle of how this can be consistent with the 3-dimensional space that we live in.
A group of 3 researchers, Jun Nishimura (associate professor at KEK), Asato Tsuchiya (associate professor at Shizuoka University) and Sang-Woo Kim (project researcher at Osaka University) has succeeded in simulating the birth of the universe, using a supercomputer for calculations based on superstring theory. This showed that the universe had 9 spatial dimensions at the beginning, but only 3 of these underwent expansion at some point in time…”

wait, WHAT.

Is it odd to anyone else that Einstein was a celebrity, but this research, essentially solving the universe, is lost in the blogosphere? Shouldn’t this be a headline?

^

astrotastic:

divineirony:

thepoemthatdoesntrhyme:

miu-sherandhiscollar:

A 40-year-old puzzle of superstring theory solved by supercomputer

A group of three researchers from KEK, Shizuoka University and Osaka University has for the first time revealed the way our universe was born with 3 spatial dimensions from 10-dimensional superstring theory in which spacetime has 9 spatial directions and 1 temporal direction. This result was obtained by numerical simulation on a supercomputer.

“According to Big Bang cosmology, the universe originated in an explosion from an invisibly tiny point. This theory is strongly supported by observation of the cosmic microwave background and the relative abundance of elements. However, a situation in which the whole universe is a tiny point exceeds the reach of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, and for that reason it has not been possible to clarify how the universe actually originated.

In superstring theory, which is considered to be the “theory of everything”, all the elementary particles are represented as various oscillation modes of very tiny strings. Among those oscillation modes, there is one that corresponds to a particle that mediates gravity, and thus the general theory of relativity can be naturally extended to the scale of elementary particles. Therefore, it is expected that superstring theory allows the investigation of the birth of the universe. However, actual calculation has been intractable because the interaction between strings is strong, so all investigation thus far has been restricted to discussing various models or scenarios.

Superstring theory predicts a space with 9 dimensions, which poses the big puzzle of how this can be consistent with the 3-dimensional space that we live in.

A group of 3 researchers, Jun Nishimura (associate professor at KEK), Asato Tsuchiya (associate professor at Shizuoka University) and Sang-Woo Kim (project researcher at Osaka University) has succeeded in simulating the birth of the universe, using a supercomputer for calculations based on superstring theory. This showed that the universe had 9 spatial dimensions at the beginning, but only 3 of these underwent expansion at some point in time…”

wait, WHAT.

Is it odd to anyone else that Einstein was a celebrity, but this research, essentially solving the universe, is lost in the blogosphere? Shouldn’t this be a headline?

^

2 years ago on December/28/2011 at 12:13am with 193 notesReblog
#physics  #science 
the-star-stuff:

10 Particle Detectors That Let Us See the Fabric of the Universe

All atoms are made up of subatomic particles. But not every particle spends its time locked into an atom. Some particles, like neutrinos, whiz around and through our oblivious bodies every day, while others are created when humans smash matter together at high speeds. To see these ultra-tiny particles, however, we have to use enormous machines called particle detectors.
1. Super-Kamiokande ExperimentDeep in the Japanese Kamioka mine, 1000 meters below the surface, a huge stainless steel cylinder sits, lined with 13,000 photomultiplier tubes and filled with 50,000 tons of purified water. 
2. ANTARESThe ANTARES experiment 2.5 kilometers beneath the Mediterranean Sea is a Cherenkov detector like the Super-Kamiokande experiment, but it looks at neutrino interactions with the water in the naturally occurring ocean, and detects the resulting Cherenkov light with arrays of photomultiplier-based optical modules.
3. BaikalSimilarly to ANTARES, the neutrino telescope in Russia’s Lake Baikal also uses arrays of optical sensors to search for neutrinos. Unlike ANTARES, however, the Baikal detector has a winter camp, when it must be reached by drilling through the ice that forms over it. 
4. IceCube Neutrino ObservatoryThe IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica makes the on in Baikal look wimpy. It also relies on water-albeit in its solid phase—to ferret out neutrinos from space. But although it uses the same type of regular array employed by ANTARES and Baikal, this array cannot merely be lowered into the solid ice of the South Pole. 
5. Soudan Underground Laboratory’s CDMS IIMinnesota’s Soudan Mine is the oldest mine for iron ore in Minnesota-and in addition to iron, it also houses detectors for both neutrinos and dark matter thousands of feet below the surface. 
6. SLAC’s Fermi Gamma Ray Space TelescopeDetectors in the sea, detectors in the ice, and now, a particle detector…in space! SLAC’s Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope was launched in June 2008 to look at high energy gamma rays. Although its function is to act as a telescope, its operation isanalogous to that of a particle detector. 
7. CERN’s ATLAS detectorCERN’s Large Hadron Collider can be used for a variety of experiments, and each detector focuses on looking for something different. Its most sizeable detector, ATLAS, is also the largest general-purpose particle detector in the world. 
8. CERN’s CMS detectorThere’s too much physics going on at the Large Hadron Collider to limit ourselves to only one of their detectors. Besides, ATLAS may have a greater volume, but at 12,500 tons, the LHC’s Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, outweighs it. Like ATLAS, CMS serves as a general-purpose detector. 
9. The Collider Detector at FermiLab (CDF)In FermiLab’s Tevatron collider, beams of protons and antiprotons crash into each other, CDF looks at the resulting carnage. Although the Tevatron has seen the top and bottom quarks, the W and Z bosons (which CERN had found first), and other fundamental particles, it was most frequently in the news this year for its race to beat CERN to the discovery of the Higgs Boson. 
10. Brookhaven National Lab’s PHENIX and STAR detectorsAt Brookhaven National Lab, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smashes beams of relatively heavy gold ions together at relativistic speeds. Because the ions are a lot heavier than the particles that smash together at CERN or FermiLab, they also carry less energy.
Image via IceCube

the-star-stuff:

10 Particle Detectors That Let Us See the Fabric of the Universe

All atoms are made up of subatomic particles. But not every particle spends its time locked into an atom. Some particles, like neutrinos, whiz around and through our oblivious bodies every day, while others are created when humans smash matter together at high speeds. To see these ultra-tiny particles, however, we have to use enormous machines called particle detectors.

1. Super-Kamiokande Experiment
Deep in the Japanese Kamioka mine, 1000 meters below the surface, a huge stainless steel cylinder sits, lined with 13,000 photomultiplier tubes and filled with 50,000 tons of purified water. 

2. ANTARES
The ANTARES experiment 2.5 kilometers beneath the Mediterranean Sea is a Cherenkov detector like the Super-Kamiokande experiment, but it looks at neutrino interactions with the water in the naturally occurring ocean, and detects the resulting Cherenkov light with arrays of photomultiplier-based optical modules.

3. Baikal
Similarly to ANTARES, the neutrino telescope in Russia’s Lake Baikal also uses arrays of optical sensors to search for neutrinos. Unlike ANTARES, however, the Baikal detector has a winter camp, when it must be reached by drilling through the ice that forms over it. 

4. IceCube Neutrino Observatory
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica makes the on in Baikal look wimpy. It also relies on water-albeit in its solid phase—to ferret out neutrinos from space. But although it uses the same type of regular array employed by ANTARES and Baikal, this array cannot merely be lowered into the solid ice of the South Pole. 

5. Soudan Underground Laboratory’s CDMS II
Minnesota’s Soudan Mine is the oldest mine for iron ore in Minnesota-and in addition to iron, it also houses detectors for both neutrinos and dark matter thousands of feet below the surface. 

6. SLAC’s Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope
Detectors in the sea, detectors in the ice, and now, a particle detector…in space! SLAC’s Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope was launched in June 2008 to look at high energy gamma rays. Although its function is to act as a telescope, its operation isanalogous to that of a particle detector

7. CERN’s ATLAS detector
CERN’s Large Hadron Collider can be used for a variety of experiments, and each detector focuses on looking for something different. Its most sizeable detector, ATLAS, is also the largest general-purpose particle detector in the world. 

8. CERN’s CMS detector
There’s too much physics going on at the Large Hadron Collider to limit ourselves to only one of their detectors. Besides, ATLAS may have a greater volume, but at 12,500 tons, the LHC’s Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, outweighs it. Like ATLAS, CMS serves as a general-purpose detector. 

9. The Collider Detector at FermiLab (CDF)
In FermiLab’s Tevatron collider, beams of protons and antiprotons crash into each other, CDF looks at the resulting carnage. Although the Tevatron has seen the top and bottom quarks, the W and Z bosons (which CERN had found first), and other fundamental particles, it was most frequently in the news this year for its race to beat CERN to the discovery of the Higgs Boson

10. Brookhaven National Lab’s PHENIX and STAR detectors
At Brookhaven National Lab, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smashes beams of relatively heavy gold ions together at relativistic speeds. Because the ions are a lot heavier than the particles that smash together at CERN or FermiLab, they also carry less energy.

Image via IceCube